Collection of over 170 antiques from estate of Sir John Harvey-Jones are being sold at auction 

A collection of antiques from the former estate of Britain’s first reality TV business guru is expected to fetch thousands at auction.

More than 170 items were recovered from the Caemawr estate in North Wales where Sir John Harvey-Jones lived with his wife Lady Mary Evelyn.

The presenter of BBC show Troubleshooter amassed the haul of fine antiques and quirky collectables, some dating back to the 1600s, before his death in 2008.

Items for sale includes a 19th Century curiosity featuring a framed letter, addressed to Mrs McCartney, and crocheted miniature baby boots, mittens and bonnet

Items for sale includes a 19th Century curiosity featuring a framed letter, addressed to Mrs McCartney, and crocheted miniature baby boots, mittens and bonnet

His family are now auctioning off the historic contents of the property, including antique cups and trinket boxes, and they are expected to fetch tens of thousands of pounds when they go under the hammer

His family are now auctioning off the historic contents of the property, including antique cups and trinket boxes, and they are expected to fetch tens of thousands of pounds when they go under the hammer

The presenter of BBC show Troubleshooter (pictured) amassed the haul of fine antiques and quirky collectables, some dating back to the 1600s, before his death in 2008

The presenter of BBC show Troubleshooter (pictured) amassed the haul of fine antiques and quirky collectables, some dating back to the 1600s, before his death in 2008

His family are now auctioning off the historic contents of the property and they are expected to fetch tens of thousands of pounds when they go under the hammer.

The eclectic collection of antiques features furniture dating back to the 1600s as well as paintings, silver, metalware and ceramics.

The items will go under the hammer at Hansons Auctioneers’ Antiques and Collectors sale from February 1 to 4. 

Charles Hanson, owner of Hansons Auctioneers, which is handling the sale, said: ‘We’re delighted to handle the sale of contents from this important estate.

‘As well as some fine antiques there are some fascinating quirky items.

The presenter of BBC show Troubleshooter amassed the haul of fine antiques including a doll

The quirky collectables, some dating back to the 1600s, include a toy bear

The presenter of BBC show Troubleshooter amassed the haul of fine antiques and quirky collectables, some dating back to the 1600s, including an antique doll and a toy bear 

The family are now auctioning off the historic contents of the TV presenter's North Welsh property, including a 'German 19th Century brass telescope (pictured)

The family are now auctioning off the historic contents of the TV presenter’s North Welsh property, including a ‘German 19th Century brass telescope (pictured)

Classic items up for auction include an oil painting of a dog with cricket bat and ball, attributed to British/American artist Maud Earl with an estimate of £150-£200

Classic items up for auction include an oil painting of a dog with cricket bat and ball, attributed to British/American artist Maud Earl with an estimate of £150-£200

More than 170 items were recovered from the Caemawr estate in North Wales where Sir John Harvey-Jones lived with his wife Lady Mary Evelyn (pictured)

More than 170 items were recovered from the Caemawr estate in North Wales where Sir John Harvey-Jones lived with his wife Lady Mary Evelyn (pictured) 

‘For example, lot 3065 is a 19th Century curiosity featuring a framed letter and crocheted miniature baby boots, mittens and bonnet.

‘The letter is addressed to Mrs McCartney and the reverse reads: “Some little curiositys (sic) done by the female orphans in connexion with the Plymouth Brethren Bristol – with Hannah – love”.’

He added the estate also revealed a ‘German 19th Century brass telescope’ and furniture including ‘a mahogany bureau’ and a ‘George IV miniature dressing mirror’.

Classic items up for auction include an oil painting of a dog with cricket bat and ball, attributed to British/American artist Maud Earl with an estimate of £150-£200.

A circa 1710 oak dresser base, pictured, is expected to fetch between £500-£700 at the auction. There is also a joined oak chest of drawers, estimated at £300-£500

A circa 1710 oak dresser base, pictured, is expected to fetch between £500-£700 at the auction. There is also a joined oak chest of drawers, estimated at £300-£500

Adrian Kinton, from Hansons Auctioneers, holds a miniature mahogany apprentice press bureau from the Harvey-Jones collection (pictured)

Adrian Kinton, from Hansons Auctioneers, holds a miniature mahogany apprentice press bureau from the Harvey-Jones collection (pictured) 

An early 19th century British School portrait of a girl in a white dress holding a flower, is expected to fetch £200-300.

Other objects include an eight-day John Beaven of Woolwich mantle clock in mahogany and a 19th Century mahogany easel/folio stand.

Furniture includes a late 17th Century joined oak clothes press with lunette carved frieze bearing the initials ‘EB’ and converted into a wardrobe.

There is also a joined oak chest of drawers, estimated at £300-£500, a circa 1710 oak dresser base, at £500-£700.

Furniture includes a late 17th Century joined oak clothes press with lunette carved frieze which was converted into a wardrobe

Furniture includes a late 17th Century joined oak clothes press with lunette carved frieze which was converted into a wardrobe 

The eclectic collection of antiques features portraits of young gentlemen, circa 1790, pictured. Some paintings are expected to fetch between £200-£300 at auction

The eclectic collection of antiques features portraits of young gentlemen, circa 1790, pictured. Some paintings are expected to fetch between £200-£300 at auction 

The items, including an antique pram, will go under the hammer at Hansons Auctioneers' Antiques and Collectors sale from February 1 to 4

The items, including an antique pram, will go under the hammer at Hansons Auctioneers’ Antiques and Collectors sale from February 1 to 4

A joined oak side table, circa 1680, could fetch between £200-£300. 

The flamboyant businessman found fame on the BBC show in the 1990s where he dispensed advice to struggling firms.  

As chairman of ICI in the 1980s, he doubled the price of the company’s shares within 30 months and turned a loss into a £1 billion profit.

Sir John was awarded the Industrialist of the Year title three times and was knighted for services to industry. 

Born in Hackney, London, in 1924, Sir John spent his early childhood in India where his father was an Army officer. 

Also for sale are stone wash sash window stoppers in the shape of ladies and lions heads, pictured. Other items that will go under the hammer are an eight-day John Beaven of Woolwich mantle clock and a 19th Century mahogany easel/folio stand

Also for sale are stone wash sash window stoppers in the shape of ladies and lions heads, pictured. Other items that will go under the hammer are an eight-day John Beaven of Woolwich mantle clock and a 19th Century mahogany easel/folio stand

The flamboyant businessman found fame on the BBC show in the 1990s. His collection of antiques include vintage wooden toys, pictured, as well as paintings and furniture

The flamboyant businessman found fame on the BBC show in the 1990s. His collection of antiques include vintage wooden toys, pictured, as well as paintings and furniture 

In 1940, aged only 16 and with the Second World War under way, he joined HMS Diomede as a midshipman. Two ships he served on were sunk by enemy action.

After the war, he went to Cambridge University to learn Russian and joined Naval Intelligence as an interpreter.

Rising to the rank of lieutenant-commander, he was awarded a military MBE in 1952 for his work in Naval Intelligence.

In 1956 he joined ICI as a junior training manager and worked his way up to become chairman in 1982.

He died at the age of 83 in 2008 at Hereford County Hospital.

Sir John Harvey-Jones: The first reality TV business guru who found fame on BBC’s Troubleshooter

Born in Hackney, London, in 1924, Sir John spent his early childhood in India where his father was an Army officer.

At seven, he was sent to a strict boarding school in Kent and in 1937 he joined Dartmouth Royal Naval College as a cadet.

In 1940, aged only 16 and with the Second World War under way, he joined HMS Diomede as a midshipman. Two ships he served on were sunk by enemy action.

After the war, he went to Cambridge University to learn Russian and joined Naval Intelligence as an interpreter. Rising to the rank of lieutenant-commander, he was awarded a military MBE in 1952 for his work in Naval Intelligence.

In 1956 he joined ICI as a junior training manager and worked his way up to become chairman in 1982.

As chairman of ICI in the 1980s, he doubled the price of the company’s shares within 30 months and turned a loss into a £1 billion profit.

Sir John was awarded the Industrialist of the Year title three times and was knighted for services to industry, and was also honorary vice president of the Institute of Marketing, and chairman of The Economist from 1989 to 1994. 

In the 1990s, the businessman found fame on the BBC show Troubleshooter, where he dispensed advice to struggling firms. 

He died at the age of 83 in 2008 at Hereford County Hospital.

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