The WHO warns of “catastrophic moral failure” over coronavirus vaccine access

World Health Organization chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned Monday the world is “on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure” because of unequal COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

Why it matters: Tedros noted during an executive session that 39 million vaccine doses had been administered in 49 higher-income countries, while one lowest-income nation had “just 25 doses.”

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  • This “me-first” approach will ultimately “prolong the pandemic, the restrictions needed to contain it, and human and economic suffering,” he added.

Of note: The WHO itself faced criticism in an interim report on Monday for being slow to respond to the outbreak after it was first detected in late 2019 in China, which was also singled out for failings early on.

  • “The global pandemic alert system is not fit for purpose,” said the preliminary report by the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response, an independent panel commissioned by the WHO.

  • “The WHO has been underpowered to do the job.”

What they’re saying: China’s public health measures “could have been applied more forcefully by local and national health authorities” in January, said the report’s panel of experts, led by former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark and former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

  • The experts noted it was unclear why the WHO did not meet until the third week of January 2020, nor why it was unable to agree to declaring a Public Health Emergency of International Concern until a week later.

What to watch: A World Health Organization team of researchers is in Wuhan, China, investigating the origins of the pandemic.

  • Tedros said his focus is on the roll-out of the global vaccine-sharing scheme COVAX, which is due to begin next month. Over 180 countries have signed up to the WHO-led scheme.

  • He hopes that by World Health Day on April 7, COVID-19 vaccines “are being administered in every country, as a symbol of hope for overcoming both the pandemic and the inequalities that lie at the root of so many global health challenges.”

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